Opening The Door To Fear

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I had to speak to my staff today about how to triage patients with possible Ebola using the new system wide protocol.

That really bothered me.

Talking about it made it feel more real, the possibility of it here. I tried not to scare everyone but I also wanted them to understand how serious this is, that it has to be handled the right way to save lives.

Somewhere that first US case is going to show up.

A tiny part of me is scared and wants to run. But I know I won’t.

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27 thoughts on “Opening The Door To Fear

  1. I read a really good novel a few years ago written by an emergency room dr. about the SARS outbreak in Toronto. One scene that really stood out was when the nurses had to have a lottery to decide who would work the ward with the SARS patients. Worst lottery ever. I heard a vaccine is close to being created. Is this true?

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      • I hear one exists. It has been used at least once. But where it is and when it will be available and for whom? Who knows. When swine flu was rampant and pregnant women were the most vulnerable, I was pregnant. No vaccine until too late. We did everything we could…everyone wore masks, gloves, washed hands over and over again, and we disinfected rooms after each patient. But I still fell ill. All ended well, but it reinforced how vulnerable we are on the front lines. Maybe nothing will happen. I hope that is the case.

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      • I got H1N1 and it just about killed me. I never get sick. Ever. And I don’t know how I got it. We are very big on hygene at work and I caught it early, I didn’t even have a chance to get the vaccine. I was really, really, sick for a couple of weeks and it took months for my lungs to recover. My wife, who is sick a lot, was fine, wich is good because it probably would have killed her. I wonder if we have become too good at fighting disease, like maybe eventually one will evolve that is so powerful and adabtable we won’t be able to fight it.

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      • Ebola might be it. High kill rate. Maybe it won’t be as deadly in developed countries? Again, I hope we don’t have to find out. I hope we are all over reacting. Better to over react than be taken by surprise, though.

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  2. I’ve been following the story of Ebola, mostly through Reuters, which told me that researchers will begin testing a vaccine as soon as next month after it got good results in primates. As a planet, we should all keep our fingers crossed.

    Mine will be especially tightly crossed for you, my new blogging buddy, as you may be in danger in your efforts to try to do your job. I think that the world at large, in this day of wonder drugs and daily medical miracles, forget that to be a doctor can be as risky as being a firefighter or a cop.

    Still, I am confident that while you may open the door to fear (who wouldn’t?) you will help close it tightly against Ebola’s spread!

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  3. Weirdly enough before the first case arrived in Lagos and an American doctor died, no one cared… RFI and Al Jazeera have been reporting about it from day 1, several months ago but it was the death of an American doctor which was the wake up call the West needed…it is always like that but it still hurts a lot for the African that I am 🙂 Good for you for being prepared ! Anyway, it might just “die down” like the previous ebola in DRC/great lakes area!

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  4. The planet is due another cleansing and epidemics rarely care about wealth, nation status, or such. There is much bandying about in some of the survival groups that I follow, and the usual fear mongering. I have a daughter flying today, and it is that environment that frightens me the most – recirculated air and people from everywhere who have been everywhere else.

    I’ll prepare as I do with anything, my trusted oregano oil in hand. It’s proven historically beneficial in my life when faced with other, life-threatening bugs.

    Best wishes to you, and thank you for your work.

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  5. I was working in Taiwan during the SARS breakout, and operating on SARS patients. One of our residents in the team died in ICU and we were all quarantined. It was interesting times. I remember washing my hand like crazy during that time. It becomes so real when it’s on your front door. Let’s hope they didn’t make a huge mistake by transporting those American EBOLA aid workers home!!!

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