Tall and Skinny, No Whip

The Empire State Building

“Your patient is on social media Tweeting about it.”

“Tweeting about what?”

“The weight thing that prints out on the after visit summary for the patients.”

Come to find out she had also called and spoken to my office manager and my practice administrator. 

Good for her.

When we first moved to this electronic health record last fall one of the most annoying things was that on everyone that the program deemed “overweight” or “obese” got a large bright yellow box on the screen that alerted to me to the fact that I needed to add weight loss to their goals. 

I always hit the ignore button but it annoyed me that now I had to click an extra button because it stood between me and each patient’s active problem list. Not everyone needs to have “obesity” on their problem list and I would argue that NO ONE should have “overweight” as an official diagnosis. People who are “overweight” and  “obese” know good and well where they fall. They certainly do not need a computer “diagnosing” them with it, too.

I growled inside each time I saw that yellow box.

Then sometime in March I noticed that all of my “overweight” and “obese” patients were getting detailed weight loss instructions printed on their end of visit paperwork. It was going so far as to tell them exactly how much weight they needed to lose to reach a BMI of 25.

WHAT? I didn’t tell it to do that!

It was autopropagating. Someone flipped a switch somewhere which meant a good many other someones approved the change.

What were they thinking?

Shouldn’t I have control over that? Shouldn’t I be the one to decide? I am the doctor. I know the patient. 

I complained.

Nothing happened.

I mentioned it again.

Still nothing happened.

Some of my patients have eating disorders. A number of my patients have serious emotional issues wrapped up in their obesity. These people for sure should not end up with that kind of stuff on their handouts.

I messed around with the program for a while and discovered that I could manually remove it from the print outs if I clicked an obscure “X” box on the wrap up page at the end of the visit. I have to scroll down to the bottom of the screen to find it. That meant that on every patient I see every day I would have to scroll down to that area and click a box to remove weight from their goals.

I should not have to do that. There are literally 30 million other clicks I have to remember on each patient at each visit. Give me a busy day and things will slip through the cracks. This is something where the cost of human error is too great in my opinion.

For this patient, I was running 30 minutes behind. On hers I forgot to click the button. The print out told her she needed to loose over 30 pounds and detailed the diet and exercise changes she needed to make to get that accomplished. So she went to social media with it.

Suddenly, everyone downtown started scrambling. There will be a meeting now to discuss this.

And I am so very angry.

But not at her.

What does it say about a system that responds to social media pressure before it listens to its own physicians? And why would you ever pick a BMI of 25 and set it as the automatic weight loss goal for every single patient? What about the studies that show that people who are in “normal” BMI range do not live as long as those in the overweight range? That a decrease in life expectancy does not occur in obesity except for the extreme morbid obesity range?

Obesity isn’t killing people. Diabetes is. Cardiovascular disease is. We have put such a focus on weight that we have sabotaged the patients who are most vulnerable and as far as I am concerned we are killing them.

“I can’t lose weight so what’s the point of exercising and eating healthy?” 

I hear this every day.

Weight is not the point. It should not be the point. Healthy lifestyle is. But rather than use those things as the goals they made weight loss THE goal.

Fine.

Maybe I cannot change their mind. Maybe I cannot change yours. But do NOT force me to participate in a game that I do not want to play.

Next time I see that woman I am going to give her a great big hug and a high five.

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128 thoughts on “Tall and Skinny, No Whip

  1. Brilliant. Patients need to start speaking up, and if social media is how they can get things moving then so be it. The fact that the companies don’t listen to their physicians first is ludicrous (and their hoops are probably the reason you were running behind that day anyway).
    Keep fighting the good fight!

    Liked by 1 person

    • I think the people making these requirements and bad calls are so far out of touch with patient needs that it is shameful. Of note, the handout was changed to take out BMI but it still references weight loss and prints automatically on everyone with a BMI over 25. We still have work to do.

      Like

  2. We are getting to the point where computer-driven software is telling the patient what to do.
    (Not to mention my odyssey this month in the French medical (non)system…
    The President of the most powerful nation on the planet thinks he can run the country (hence the world) on Tweeter.
    Orwell, here we are.
    As a blogger friend from South Africa just wrote me: “Is the world getting madder, or are we noticing it more?” (He’s in his mid-70’s, he’s been around).
    My answer was and is: “both”!

    Liked by 1 person

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